Title

Does participation in extended immersive ward-based simulation improve the preparedness of undergraduate bachelor’s degree nursing students to be ready for clinical practice as a registered nurse? An integrative literature review

Author Identifier

Hugh Davies

ORCID : 0000-0002-0867-2288

Deborah Sundin

ORCID : 0000-0003-4477-9813

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Clinical Nursing

Volume

30

Issue

19-20

First Page

2897

Last Page

2911

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

35994

Comments

Davies, H., Sundin, D., Robinson, S., & Jacob, E. (2021). Does participation in extended immersive ward‐based simulation improve the preparedness of undergraduate bachelor’s degree nursing students to be ready for clinical practice as a registered nurse? An integrative literature review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 30(19-20), 2897-2911. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15796

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To determine if extended immersive ward-based simulation programmes improve the preparedness of undergraduate bachelor's degree nursing students to be ward ready for professional practice as a registered nurse. Background: The practice readiness of new graduate nurses to enter the workforce continues to raise concern among educators and industry. Often the transition period is a vulnerable time when the reality of clinical practice bears little resemblance of their experiences as a student. Simulation of a busy ward offers the opportunity for pre-registered nurses to practise a variety of situations they are likely to encounter once qualified in a safe and supportive learning environment. Methods: The review considered studies that investigated the experiences and learning outcomes of nursing students following participation in extended immersive ward-based simulation. Databases searched included CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline and Scopus. Two reviewers independently assessed retrieved studies that matched inclusion criteria using standardised critical appraisal instruments. Reporting of review followed PRISMA checklist. Results: Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies used a quasi-experimental mixed methods approach (10). Programme evaluations focused on self-reporting in learning satisfaction and student perceptions of performance. Six studies used a pre- and post-test design to compare the after effect on preparedness for professional practice. Two studies investigated student learning between simulated experiences and experiences gained during clinical placements. Conclusion: Learning satisfaction was high among students who participated in programmes that incorporated extended immersive ward-based simulation experiences. Students are able to practise what they need to know and on what will be expected of them in professional practice. Evidence on whether these programmes make a difference in workplace performance, and retention of graduate nurses is yet to be established. Relevance to clinical practice: Extended immersive ward-based simulation allows educators the opportunity to meet the perceived needs of students in preparation for professional practice.

DOI

10.1111/jocn.15796

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Safety and quality in health care

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