Author Identifier

Claus T Christophersen

ORCID : 0000-0003-1591-5871

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Microorganisms

Volume

9

Issue

10

Publisher

MDPI

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Integrative Metabolomics and Computational Biology

RAS ID

40567

Funders

National Health and Medical Research Council Larsson Rosenquist Foundation

Comments

Parkin, K., Christophersen, C. T., Verhasselt, V., Cooper, M. N., & Martino, D. (2021). Risk factors for gut dysbiosis in early life. Microorganisms, 9(10), article 2066. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9102066

Abstract

Dysbiosis refers to a reduction in microbial diversity, combined with a loss of beneficial taxa, and an increase in pathogenic microorganisms. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota can have a substantial effect on the nervous and immune systems, contributing to the onset of several inflammatory diseases. Epidemiological studies provided insight in how changes in the living environment have contributed to an overall loss of diversity and key taxa in the gut microbiome, coinciding with increased reports of atopy and allergic diseases. The gut microbiome begins development at birth, with major transition periods occurring around the commencement of breastfeeding, and the introduction of solid foods. As such, the development of the gut microbiome remains highly plastic and easily influenced by environmental factors until around three years of age. Developing a diverse and rich gut microbiome during this sensitive period is crucial to setting up a stable gut microbiome into adulthood and to prevent gut dysbiosis. Currently, the delivery route, antibiotic exposure, and diet are the best studied drivers of gut microbiome development, as well as risk factors of gut dysbiosis during infancy. This review focuses on recent evidence regarding key environmental factors that contribute to promoting gut dysbiosis.

DOI

10.3390/microorganisms9102066

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Exercise, nutrition, lifestyle and other interventions for optimal health across the lifespan

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