Author Identifier

Shelley Beatty

ORCID : 0000-0002-8230-9735

Marcus Cattani

ORCID : 0000-0002-7586-7288

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Safety Science

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

32527

Funders

Edith Cowan University - Open Access Support Scheme 2021

Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP)

DMIRS Mines Safety Roadshow

Comments

Jenke, T., Boylan, J. L., Beatty, S., Ralph, M., Chaplyn, A., Penney, G., & Cattani, M. (2021). Fatality risk management: Applying Quinlan’s ten pathways in Western Australia’s mining industry. Safety Science, 146, article 105494. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssci.2021.105494

Abstract

In ‘Ten Pathways to Death and Disaster’ Professor Michael Quinlan (2014) identified a series of ten common catastrophic incident risk factors, known as the Ten Pathways, contributing to major incidents in mining and other high hazard industries. This study applies the Quinlan methodology in two separate phases. The first phase of the study explored employee perception of employer effectiveness of fatality prevention against each of the Ten Pathways through a questionnaire of n = 2009 participants at the 2017–2019 Western Australian Government Mines Safety Roadshows. Respondents generally perceived their employer as having a relatively good understanding of the role of risk assessments and their importance in preventing injuries yet perceived their employers as generally ineffective in management system auditing. In the second phase of the study, 71 fatality reports on the Western Australian Government Department of Mines Fatalities register were assessed to identify the Ten Pathways involved in the fatality. The analysis identified fatalities typically included four or five of the Ten Pathways, although none of the investigations analysed all Ten Pathways. A combined assessment of employee perceptions of employer’s effectiveness at fatality prevention and pathways present in the Mines Fatalities register identified which Quinlan Ten Pathways mining organisations should prioritise for fatality prevention. It is recommended that benchmarking safety performance, incident investigations, and reviews of effectiveness of safety management systems include an examination and verification of the organisation’s response to Ten Pathways, a relatively straight forward task which may highlight latent issues or weaknesses that may otherwise remain undetected.

DOI

10.1016/j.ssci.2021.105494

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Individual, economic, organisational, political and social transformation

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