Author Identifier

Wei Wang

ORCID : 0000-0002-1430-1360

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

EPMA Journal

Volume

12

Publisher

Springer

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Precision Health

RAS ID

39767

Funders

The Australia-China International Collaborative Grant

Edith Cowan University

National Health and Medical Research Council

Grant Number

NHMRC Number : APP1112767

Comments

This version of the article has been accepted for publication, after peer review (when applicable) and is subject to Springer Nature’s AM terms of use, but is not the Version of Record and does not reflect post-acceptance improvements, or any corrections. The Version of Record is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13167-021-00258-x

Anto, E. O., Coall, D. A., Addai-Mensah, O., Wiafe, Y. A., Owiredu, W. K. B. A., Obirikorang, C., . . . Wang, W. (2021). Early gestational profiling of oxidative stress and angiogenic growth mediators as predictive, preventive and personalised (3P) medical approach to identify suboptimal health pregnant mothers likely to develop preeclampsia. EPMA Journal, 12, p. 517-534.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s13167-021-00258-x

Abstract

Pregnant women, particularly in developing countries are facing a huge burden of preeclampsia (PE) leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. This is due to delayed diagnosis and unrecognised early targeted preventive measures. Adapting innovative solutions via shifting from delayed to early diagnosis of PE in the context of predictive diagnosis, targeted prevention and personalisation of medical care (PPPM/3 PM) is essential. The subjective assessment of suboptimal health status (SHS) and objective biomarkers of oxidative stress (OS) and angiogenic growth mediators (AGMs) could be used as new PPPM approach for PE; however, these factors have only been studied in isolation with no data on their combine assessment. This study profiled early gestational biomarkers of OS and AGMs as 3 PM approach to identify SHS pregnant mothers likely to develop PE specifically, early-onset PE (EO-PE) and late-onset PE (LO-PE).

DOI

10.1007/s13167-021-00258-x

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