Author Identifier

Beverley Ewens

ORCID : 0000-0003-2008-7214

Vivien Kemp

ORCID : 0000-0001-6577-2720

Diana Arabiat

ORCID : 0000-0003-2325-0398

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Australian Critical Care

Volume

34

Issue

6

First Page

604

Last Page

619

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

35635

Funders

Edith Cowan University

Comments

This is an Authors Accepted Manuscript version of an article published by Elsevier, at Ewens, B., Collyer, D., Kemp, V., & Arabiat, D. (2021). The enablers and barriers to children visiting their ill parent/carer in intensive care units: A scoping review. Australian Critical Care, 34(6), 604-619. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2020.12.009

Ewens, B., Collyer, D., Kemp, V., & Arabiat, D. (2021). The enablers and barriers to children visiting their ill parent/carer in intensive care units: A scoping review. Australian Critical Care, 34(6), 604-619. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2020.12.009

Abstract

Aim: The aim of the study was to identify the enablers and/or barriers to children visiting their ill parent/carer in intensive care units by examining the visiting policies as practiced or perceived by nurses and experienced or perceived by parents and caregivers. Review method: This is a scoping review following Joanna Briggs Institute Protocol Guidelines. Data sources: An extensive literature search of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, PsychINFO, PubMed, and Excerpta Medica dataBASE databases, using key terms, was conducted between May 2019 and July 2020; studies published between 1990 and 2020 were considered for inclusion. Double screening, extraction, and coding of the data using thematic analysis and frequency counts were used. Results: Fifteen barriers, 19 facilitators, nine situationally contingent factors, and six personal judgement considerations were identified that influenced children visiting their ill parent/carer in intensive care units. Most barriers (n = 10) were related to organisational factors including restrictive policies, nurses' level of education, age, working hours, nurses' attitudes, and lack of required skills to promote emotional resilience and/or to communicate with children. Family perception factors relating to parents' perceptions, attitudes and concerns of staff/parents, and anticipated behaviours of children were also identified as both barriers and facilitators. Conclusions: There is a lack of consistency in the application of policies and procedures to facilitate children visiting their loved ones in an intensive care unit. Without key involvement from the nurses and healthcare team, there may have been opportunities lost to optimise family-centred care practices in critical care settings.

DOI

10.1016/j.aucc.2020.12.009

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Safety and quality in health care

Available for download on Thursday, November 30, 2023

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