Title

Effect of rock wettability on the electric resistivity of hydrate formations: An experimental investigation

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Energy & Fuels

Volume

35

Issue

24

First Page

20037

Last Page

20045

Publisher

ACS Publications

School

School of Engineering / Centre for Sustainable Energy and Resources / Graduate Research

RAS ID

42662

Funders

Higher Education of Pakistan Ministry

Strengthening of Dawood University of Engineering and Technology scholarship program

Comments

Abbasi, G. R., Al-Yaseri, A., Awan, F. U. R., Isah, A., Keshavarz, A., & Iglauer, S. (2021). Effect of rock wettability on the electric resistivity of hydrate formations: An experimental investigation. Energy & Fuels, 35(24), 20037-20045.

https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.energyfuels.1c03171

Abstract

Gas hydrates are large energy resources with estimated global reserves of approximately 500–10 000 Gt of carbon, which can be extracted from underground reservoirs. In addition, such reservoirs can potentially catastrophically release greenhouse gases (such as methane or carbon dioxide). Classically, rock wettability is one of the key factors in predicting fluid flow behavior, fluid distribution, reserves, and productivities. However, the effect of wettability on the electric resistivity of hydrate formations is poorly understood. Thus, to evaluate the influence of rock wettability on the electrical resistivity (note that resistivity logging is a key well logging tool) of hydrate-bearing sandstone, nuclear magnetic resonance experiments were conducted. Clearly, the effective porosity and liquid saturation increased with increasing temperature, due to hydrate dissociation. Furthermore, the resistivity index and rock resistivity (Rt) increased with increasing hydrate saturation, and the formation factor demonstrated a positive correlation with hydrate saturation, though the formation factor for oil-wet (OW) sandstone was higher than that for water-wet (WW) sandstone. This work will thus significantly improve the fundamental understanding of the petrophysical properties of gas hydrate reservoirs so that energy production can be optimized, geohazards can be avoided, and the hydrate gun hypothesis can be better assessed.

DOI

10.1021/acs.energyfuels.1c03171

Access Rights

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Research Themes

Natural and Built Environments

Priority Areas

Engineering, technology and nanotechnology

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