Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

M D P I AG

School

School of Medical and Heath Sciences/ School of Business and Law/ School of Science

RAS ID

27203

Comments

Originally published as: Butcher, L., Ryan, M., O’Sullivan, T., Lo, J., & Devine, A. (2018). What Drives Food Insecurity in Western Australia? How the Perceptions of People at Risk Differ to Those of Stakeholders. Nutrients, 10(8), 1059. Original article available here

Abstract

Food insecurity is considered a “wicked” problem due to the highly complex and at times undefined casual factors. Although many stakeholders are working to address the problem, a possible divergence exists between their views on food insecurity and those of the people who are actually experiencing the problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there was a difference between the opinions of those “at risk” and stakeholders. A total of seven focus groups (two stakeholder groups n = 10, five “at-risk” groups n = 34) and three interviews (stakeholders n = 3) were conducted to ascertain perceptions. Thematic analysis generated 329 (209 “at-risk” and 120 stakeholder) coded statements related to food insecurity drivers. Respondents were in agreement for the majority of factors, and limited income was considered the primary driver of food insecurity. However, there were notable deviations in the perceived importance of certain drivers, particularly around the price of food and the lack of food literacy. Differences in the perception of causes of food insecurity may in part be attributed to the varied role each group plays in working towards the resolution of the problem, either at the household or system level.

DOI

10.3390/nu10081059

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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