Title

Jackson on Daoism and the poetry of Randolph Stow, Judith Wright and Ursula K. Le Guin

Document Type

Other

Publisher

The High Window Press

Comments

Originally published as: Jackson. (2017, September 10). Jackson on Daoism and the poetry of Randolph Stow, Judith Wright and Ursula K. Le Guin. The High Window. Retrieved from https://thehighwindowpress.com Original article available here

Abstract

As technoscience has colonised the world, poets have felt increasingly compelled to respond to its destructive potential by trying to evoke reverence for the interconnectedness of the natural systems within which humanity is embedded. At the same time, Western science and philosophy have begun to understand this interconnectedness. The twentieth century saw the development of relativity theory, quantum mechanics, chaos theory, ecology, and psychology, in tandem with phenomenology, existentialism and postmodernism. Many scientists and philosophers have realised that the universe must, after all, be seen in terms of systems, relationships, flows and cycles, and that the boundaries between categories, such as wave and particle, observer and observed, ape and human, male and female, subject and object, are drawn primarily in our minds. (Holub 2001, 49–52; Capra and Luisi 2014)

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