Title

Terms of adoption: cultural conceptual factors underlying the adoption of English for Aboriginal communication

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publisher

Springer

Place of Publication

Singapore

RAS ID

26247

Comments

Originally published as: Malcolm I.G. (2017) Terms of Adoption: Cultural Conceptual Factors Underlying the Adoption of English for Aboriginal Communication. In: Sharifian F. (eds) Advances in Cultural Linguistics. Cultural Linguistics. Springer, Singapore. Original article available here

Abstract

Indigenous Australians have, for the most part, come to use English to express their cultural identity. Cultural Linguistics provides a means of tracing the ways in which the language has been modified to make this possible. In this overview, some of the distinctive categories, schemas, metaphors and metonymies of Aboriginal English are described. In order to bring about this different variety of English, processes of retention, elimination, modification and extension of the input varieties needed to take place. Evidence of such processes is provided. It is argued that a number of underlying cultural conceptual imperatives were the conceptual drivers of the changes that needed to take place for English to be adopted for use by Indigenous speakers as a nativised dialect. Group orientation, interconnectedness, orientation to motion, orientation to observation and awareness of the transcendent are put forward as five such imperatives. Such Cultural Linguistic evidence supports the view that Aboriginal English is a parallel development to rather than a variety of Australian English.

DOI

10.1007/978-981-10-4056-6_28

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