Title

Suboptimal health status and psychological symptoms among Chinese college students: A perspective of predictive, preventive and personalised health

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Springer Nature

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Comments

Originally published as:

Hou, H., Feng, X., Li, Y., Meng, Z., Guo, D., Wang, F., ... & Li, D. (2018). Suboptimal health status and psychological symptoms among Chinese college students: a perspective of predictive, preventive and personalised health. EPMA Journal, 9(4), 367-377.

Original article available here.

Abstract

Background

Suboptimal health status (SHS) is an intermediate health status between health and illness, a syndrome characterised by the perception of health complaints, general weakness and low energy. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of SHS and the correlation between SHS and psychological symptoms among Chinese college students and to identify the SHS-related risk factors from the perspective of predictive, preventive and personalised medicine (PPPM).

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted among 4119 college students who were enrolled from Taishan Medical University and Baoji Vocational and Technical College in the eastern and western areas of China. SHS levels of the participants were measured by an established self-reporting Suboptimal Health Status Questionnaire-25 (SHSQ-25). Psychosomatic conditions were estimated by the self-rating Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) scale. Spearman correlation analysis was applied to analyse the relationship between SHSQ-25 scores and SCL-90 estimates. Logistic regression analysis was applied for multivariate analysis.

Results

The prevalence of SHS was 21.0% (864/4119), with 23.3% (701/3005) for female students and 14.6% (163/1114) for male students. The prevalence of general positive psychological symptom was 14.2% (586/4119), with 15.6% (470/3005) for female students and 10.4% (116/1114) for male students. A strong correlation was identified between SHS score and SCL-90 estimates, with the correlation coefficient (r) of 0.719. Logistic regression showed that variables significantly associated with SHS were somatisation (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.185, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.048–4.953), obsessive-compulsive (aOR = 3.518, 95% CI = 2.834–4.368), interpersonal sensitivity (aOR = 1.883, 95% CI = 1.439–2.463) and depression (aOR = 1.847, 95% CI = 1.335–2.554).

Conclusions

Our findings confirm that there is a high prevalence of SHS among college students and there is a strong association between SHS and psychological symptoms among Chinese college students. High susceptibility of SHS occurs particularly in vulnerable groups: female students, sophomore students, medical students and students from rural area. Identification of SHS and prompt application of personalised psychological health-supporting activities will promote college students’ health status.

DOI

10.1007/s13167-018-0148-4

Share

 
COinS