Document Type

Journal Article

ISSN

24519944

Publisher

Elsevier Inc

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Comments

Originally published as: Bartlett, D. M., Domínguez D, J. F., Reyes, A., Zaenker, P., Feindel, K. W., Newton, R. U., . . . Cruickshank, T. (2019). Investigating the relationships between hypothalamic volume and measures of circadian rhythm and habitual sleep in premanifest huntington's disease. Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms, 6, 1-8. Original article available here

Abstract

Objective

Pathological changes within the hypothalamus have been proposed to mediate circadian rhythm and habitual sleep disturbances in individuals with Huntington’s disease (HD). However, investigations examining the relationships between hypothalamic volume and circadian rhythm and habitual sleep in individuals with HD are sparse. This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate the relationships between hypothalamic pathology and circadian rhythm and habitual sleep disturbances in individuals with premanifest HD.

Methods

Thirty-two individuals with premanifest HD and twenty-nine healthy age- and gender-matched controls participated in this dual-site, cross-sectional study. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed to evaluate hypothalamic volume. Circadian rhythm and habitual sleep were assessed via measurement of morning and evening cortisol and melatonin levels, wrist-worn actigraphy, the Consensus Sleep Diary and sleep questionnaires. Information on mood, physical activity levels and body composition were also collected.

Results

Compared to healthy controls, individuals with premanifest HD displayed significantly reduced grey matter volume in the hypothalamus, decreased habitual sleep efficiency and increased awakenings; however, no alterations in morning cortisol or evening melatonin release were noted in individuals with premanifest HD. While differences in the associations between hypothalamic volume and cortisol and melatonin output existed in individuals with premanifest HD compared to healthy controls, no consistent associations were observed between hypothalamic volume and circadian rhythm or habitual sleep outcomes.

Conclusion

While significant differences in associations between hypothalamic volume and cortisol and melatonin existed between individuals with premanifest HD and healthy controls, no differences in circadian markers were observed between the groups. This suggests that circadian regulation is maintained despite hypothalamic pathology, perhaps via neural compensation. Longitudinal studies are required to further understand the relationships between the hypothalamus and circadian rhythm and habitual sleep disturbances in HD as the disease course lengthens.

DOI

10.1016/j.nbscr.2018.07.001

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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