Title

Care After Lymphoma (CALy) trial: A phase II pilot pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a nurse-led model of survivorship care

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

European Journal of Oncology Nursing

Publisher

Elsevier Ltd

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

31100

Comments

Taylor, K., Chivers, P., Bulsara, C., Joske, D., Bulsara, M., & Monterosso, L. (2019). Care After Lymphoma (CALy) trial: A phase II pilot pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a nurse-led model of survivorship care. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 40, 53-62. Available here

Abstract

Purpose

Post-treatment follow-up for lymphoma potentially fails to address the supportive care needs of survivors. A nurse-led lymphoma survivorship model of care was developed and tested in a phase II pilot pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT). The intervention comprised three face-to-face appointments, delivery of tailored resources and an individualised survivorship care plan and treatment summary (SCPTS), shared with the general practitioner (GP).

Method

Three months’ post-treatment completion, eligible lymphoma patients were randomised 1:1 to usual care (control) or usual care plus intervention. Survivorship unmet needs (Short-Form Survivor Unmet Needs Survey), distress (Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21), adjustment to cancer (Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer scale) and self-empowerment (Patient Empowerment Scale) were assessed at baseline, three and six months. Univariate and multivariate analyses examined changes within and between groups at the three time points. A GP evaluation survey sought information on the perceived utility of the SCPTS.

Results

Statistical significance was set at 0.05 (2-tailed). Although not statistically significant, by study completion, intervention participants (n = 30), reported less unmet needs (M = 21.41 vs M = 25.72, p = .506), less distress ((M = 13.03 vs M = 15.14, p = .558) and an increase in empowerment (M = 50.21 vs M = 47.21, p = .056) compared with control participants (n = 30). The SCPTS was rated good to very good by a majority of GPs (n = 13, 81%).

Conclusions

The nurse-led lymphoma survivorship model of care may be a helpful intervention for lymphoma patients who had completed treatment. Survivors require individualised and tailored support and resources. A tailored SCPTS may promote survivor self-management and increase GP engagement.

DOI

10.1016/j.ejon.2019.03.005

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