Title

Cultural responses to occupation in Japan: The performing body during and after the Cold War, by Adam Broinowski

Document Type

Book Review

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

School

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts

RAS ID

28341

Comments

Originally published as: Barbe, F. (2018). [Review of the book Cultural responses to occupation in Japan: The performing body during and after the Cold War, by A. Broinowski]. Theatre Research International, 43(3), 350-351. Original publication available here

Abstract

In his research into the history of pre- and post-Second World War Japan, Adam Broinowski weaves together ‘histories of the flesh’ (p.114), situating the aesthetic performing body in relation to its sociopolitical context. This acts as context for considering Japanese ankoko butoh dance and its legacy in the work of Gekidan Kaitaisha, a performance company formed in Tokyo in 1985 by actor–director Shimizu Shinjin and performer–choreographer Hino Hiruko.There is emphasis on what it means to be‘under occupation’, particularly in the Japanese context, and how social bodies have been reflected or refracted in the aesthetic bodies of butoh and Gekidan Kaitaisha. Japanese practitioners are considered in relation to their avant-garde peers in both Japan and Europe, including the Dadaists, Antonin Artaud and Friedrich Nietzsche …

DOI

10.1017/S0307883318000664

Share

 
COinS