Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Materials

ISSN

1996-1944

Volume

12

Issue

7

PubMed ID

30925817

Publisher

MDPI AG

School

School of Engineering

RAS ID

28726

Grant Number

ARC Number : DP180104035

Comments

Originally published as: Valizadeh, A., Aslani, F., Asif, Z., & Roso, M. (2019). Development of heavyweight self-compacting concrete and ambient-cured heavyweight geopolymer concrete using magnetite aggregates. Materials, 12(7), Article 1035. Original publication available here

Abstract

Heavyweight self-compacting concrete (HWSCC) and heavyweight geopolymer concrete (HWGC) are new types of concrete that integrate the advantages of heavyweight concrete (HWC) with self-compacting concrete (SCC) and geopolymer concrete (GC), respectively. The replacement of natural coarse aggregates with magnetite aggregates in control SCC and control GC at volume ratios of 50%, 75%, and 100% was considered in this study to obtain heavyweight concrete classifications, according to British standards, which provide proper protection from sources that emit harmful radiations in medical and nuclear industries and may also be used in many offshore structures. The main aim of this study is to examine the fresh and mechanical properties of both types of mixes. The experimental program investigates the fresh properties of HWSCC and HWGC through the slump flow test. However, J-ring tests were only conducted for HWSCC mixes to ensure the flow requirements in order to achieve self-compacting properties. Moreover, the mechanical properties of both type of mixes were investigated after 7 and 28 days curing at an ambient temperature. The standard 100 × 200 mm cylinders were subjected to compressive and tensile tests. Furthermore, the flexural strength were examined by testing 450 × 100 × 100 mm prisms under four-point loading. The flexural load-displacement relationship for all mixes were also investigated. The results indicated that the maximum compressive strength of 53.54 MPa was achieved by using the control SCC mix after 28 days. However, in HWGC mixes, the maximum compressive strength of 31.31 MPa was achieved by 25% magnetite replacement samples. The overall result shows the strength of HWSCC decreases by increasing magnetite aggregate proportions, while, in HWGC mixes, the compressive strength increased with 50% magnetite replacement followed by a decrease in strength by 75% and 100% magnetite replacements. The maximum densities of 2901 and 2896 kg/m³ were obtained by 100% magnetite replacements in HWSCC and HWGC, respectively.

DOI

10.3390/ma12071035

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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