Title

Acute effects of different set configurations during a strength-oriented resistance training session on barbell velocity and the force-velocity relationship in resistance-trained males and females

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

European Journal of Applied Physiology

ISSN

1439-6327

Volume

119

Issue

6

First Page

1409

Last Page

1417

PubMed ID

30955089

Publisher

Springer

School

Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

Comments

Originally published as: Torrejón, A., Janicijevic, D., Haff, G. G., & García-Ramos, A. (2019). Acute effects of different set configurations during a strength-oriented resistance training session on barbell velocity and the force–velocity relationship in resistance-trained males and females. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 119(6), 1409-1417. Original publication available here

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the acute effects of strength-oriented resistance training sessions performed using three different set configurations on barbell velocity and the force–velocity (F–v) relationship of upper-body muscles in men and women.

Method

Thirteen men (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; 6-repetition maximum [6RM] load: 73.4 ± 15.6 kg) and 13 women (age: 21.5 ± 1.4 years; 6RM load: 32.8 ± 5.2 kg) performed 24 repetitions with a 6RM load during the bench press exercise using traditional (TR: 6 sets of 4 repetitions with 3 min of rest between sets), cluster (CL: 6 sets of 4 repetitions with 15 s of intra-set rest every two repetitions and 2 min and 45 s of rest between sets) and inter-repetition rest (IRR: 1 set of 24 repetitions with 39 s of rest between repetitions) set configurations. The F–v relationship parameters [maximum force (F0), maximum velocity (v0) and maximum power (Pmax)] were determined before and after each training session.

Results

The average training velocity did not differ between the three set configurations (p = 0.234), but the IRR set configuration generally provided higher velocities during the last repetition of each set. Significant decreases in F0 (p = 0.001) and Pmax (p = 0.024) but not in v0 (p = 0.669) were observed after the training sessions. Comparable velocity loss was observed for men and women (− 12.1% vs. − 11.3%; p = 0.699).

Conclusions

The administration of very short intra-set rest periods does not allow for the attainment of higher velocities than traditional set configurations during strength-oriented resistance training sessions conducted with the bench press exercise when the work-to-rest ratio is equated.

DOI

10.1007/s00421-019-04131-8

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