Title

Prelicensure nursing students' perspectives on video-assisted debriefing following high fidelity simulation: A qualitative study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Nurse Education Today

ISSN

1532-2793

Volume

79

First Page

1

Last Page

7

PubMed ID

31078868

Publisher

Elsevier Ltd

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Funders

Funding information available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2019.05.001

Comments

Originally published as: Zhang, H., Goh, S. H. L., Wu, X. V., Wang, W., & Mörelius, E. (2019). Prelicensure nursing students' perspectives on video-assisted debriefing following high fidelity simulation: A qualitative study. Nurse Education Today, 79, 1-7. Original publication available here

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Video-assisted debriefing has not attracted sufficient attention on exploring learners' perceptions. A full understanding of learners' attitudes and perceptions towards video-assisted debriefing sets the foundation for effective learning, which should be considered when integrating video-assisted debriefing to the nursing curricula. However, limited evidence on learners' perspectives makes it difficult to fully understand this phenomenon.

OBJECTIVES: To explore prelicensure nursing students' experiences and perspectives on video-assisted debriefing following a high-fidelity simulation.

DESIGN: An exploratory qualitative approach using focus groups.

SETTING: This study was conducted at a local university in Singapore.

PARTICIPANTS: A purposive sample of 27 prelicensure nursing students in Singapore were recruited.

METHODS: Six focus group interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the transcribed data.

RESULTS: Three themes and eight subthemes were derived from the data analysis. The themes included journey from traditional verbal debriefing to video-assisted debriefing, praise and criticism of video-assisted debriefing, and the road to successful video-assisted debriefing.

CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students revealed that video-assisted debriefing not only complemented the drawback of verbal debriefing by offering objective evidence but also improved their attitudes and behaviors through the unique experience of an emotional roller coaster. Learners should be desensitized to the fear of video and their discriminating capabilities should be developed prior to video-assisted debriefing. The findings can serve as a reference when designing and integrating video-assisted debriefing interventions into simulation-based education.

DOI

10.1016/j.nedt.2019.05.001

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