Title

Personal norms and pro-environmental binning behaviour of visitors in national parks: The development of a conceptual framework

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Group

School

School of Business and Law

RAS ID

28813

Comments

Originally published as: Esfandiar, K., Pearce, J., & Dowling, R. (2019). Personal norms and pro-environmental binning behaviour of visitors in national parks: The development of a conceptual framework. Tourism Recreation Research, 44(2) 163-177. Original publication available here

Abstract

National park tourism is an increasing trend worldwide. Understanding national park visitors’ pro-environmental behaviour is crucial as sustainability is a vital issue in the nature-based tourism industry. The primary objective of this study is to develop a conceptual model for explaining low-cost pro-environmental behaviour (i.e. behavioural choices involving low personal costs); more specifically, binning behaviour in a national park context. In this sense, we delineate low-cost pro-environmental behaviour (i.e. bin use) from high-cost forms of pro-environmental behaviour (e.g. picking up other litter) and further focus on a specific site (i.e. a national park). This study considers pro-environmental binning behaviour as a socially responsible behaviour (e.g. helping others) which is perceived more likely to be morally grounded. By considering binning behaviour as a pro-environmental personal norm and acknowledging it as a potential mediator between attitude, social norms, awareness of consequences, perceived behavioural control, and pro-environmental binning intention, this study develops a conceptual model of pro-environmental binning behaviour. The research’s theoretical contributions, its restrictions and practical implications for national parks are further discussed.

DOI

10.1080/02508281.2019.1580936

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