Title

Indigenous stroke care: Differences, challenges and a need for change

Document Type

Editorial

Publication Title

Internal Medicine Journal

ISSN

1445-5994

Volume

49

Issue

8

First Page

945

Last Page

947

PubMed ID

31387153

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Comments

Originally published as: Blacker, D., & Armstrong, E. (2019). Indigenous stroke care: Differences, challenges and a need for change. Internal Medicine Journal, 49(8), 945-947. Original publication available here

Abstract

Indigenous peoples internationally experience stroke at a higher rate and at a younger age than non‐indigenous peoples,1-7 yet relatively little is known about treatments in the acute stages post‐stroke, access to rehabilitation services or long‐term outcomes. European colonisation severely impacted indigenous cultural practices, identity and overall health of communities leaving large inequities between indigenous and non‐indigenous populations.8 However, colonisation is not just an ‘historical event’. It has ongoing ramifications in the form of government policies and society systems and rules that reflect western colonial attitudes and processes and predominate to this day. As noted by Penn et al.,9 ‘in the case of health, such systems include diagnostic frameworks and services that reinforce inequities and misalignment between indigenous and non‐indigenous views of health and wellness as well as access to appropriate services’ (see Griffiths et al.10 for further discussion)...

DOI

10.1111/imj.14399

Access Rights

free_to_read

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