Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Advanced Nursing

ISSN

1365-2648

Volume

75

Issue

10

First Page

2246

Last Page

2258

PubMed ID

31197863

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Comments

Originally published as: Foster, M., Whitehead, L., & Arabiat, D. (2019). Development and validation of the needs of children questionnaire: An instrument to measure children's self‐reported needs in hospital. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 75(10), 2246-2258. Original publication available here

Abstract

AIM: To develop and psychometrically test the needs of children questionnaire (NCQ), a new instrument to measure school-aged children's self-reported psychosocial physical and emotional needs in paediatric wards.

DESIGN: This is an instrument development study based on recommendations for developing a reliable and valid questionnaire.

METHOD: The NCQ was developed over three phases between February 2013-April 2017 and included item generation; content adequacy assessment; questionnaire administration; factor analysis; internal consistency assessment and construct validity. Psychometric properties were assessed after 193 school-aged children completed the needs of children's questionnaire in four paediatric areas in Australia and New Zealand.

RESULTS: The development and validation of the NCQ over two countries resulted in a 16-item, four-category tool to measure the self-reported importance and fulfilment of school-aged children's needs in hospital. Cronbach's alpha for the combined samples was 0.93.

CONCLUSION: The NCQ bridges a gap to measure the level of importance and fulfilment of school-aged children's self-reported needs in hospital. Future testing and validation is needed in other paediatric areas and countries.

IMPACT: The 16-item NCQ is a valid measure to evaluate if the quality of care delivered and received in hospital is in line with what children self-report as important and required and to date indicates good usability and utility. Child self-reports are essential to inform healthcare delivery, policy, research and theory development from a child and family-centred care lens that honours the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the best interests of the child.

DOI

10.1111/jan.14099

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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