Title

Posttraumatic growth amongst refugee populations: A systematic review

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Title

The Routledge International Handbook of Psychosocial Resilience

Publisher

Routledge

School

School of Arts and Humanities

RAS ID

23190

Comments

Originally published as: Sims, K., & Pooley, A. (2017). Posttraumatic growth amongst refugee populations. In U. Kumar (Ed.), The Routledge international handbook of psychosocial resilience (1st ed., Chapter 19). Original publication available here

Abstract

Personal growth following adversity is an age-old concept that can be observed in literature drawn from the fields of religion, philosophy and psychology. Fredrick Nietzsche’s famous quote “That which does not kill us makes us stronger” is an often cited example of the notion that people can change in beneficial ways following adversity. Scientific interest in growth following adversity commenced in the late 1980s with studies reporting positive changes after traumatic experiences such as combat, cardiac arrest and rape (Joseph & Butler, 2010). Research and interest in this field has grown steadily over the past two decades. Development in posttraumatic growth research has been linked to the expansion of the positive psychology movement. This movement has seen a paradigm shift that has encouraged facilitation of positive emotional states rather than a singular focus on relieving negative symptoms (Joseph & Linley, 2005; Seligman & Csikzentmihalyi, 2000)...

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