Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Molecules

ISSN

1420-3049

Volume

24

Issue

20

PubMed ID

31614625

Publisher

MDPI

School

School of Science

RAS ID

29965

Funders

Foreign Experts Bureau of Henan Province

Comments

Originally published as: Li, H., Bose, U., Stockwell, S., Howitt, C. A., & Colgrave, M. (2019). Assessing the utility of multiplexed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for gluten detection in Australian breakfast food products. Molecules, 24(20).

Original article available here.

Abstract

Coeliac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten that is associated with gastrointestinal issues, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. Gluten is a general name for a class of cereal storage proteins of wheat, barley, and rye that are notably resistant to gastrointestinal digestion. After ingestion, immunogenic peptides are subsequently recognized by T cells in the gastrointestinal tract. The only treatment for CD is a life-long gluten-free diet. As such, it is critical to detect gluten in diverse food types, including those where one would not expect to find gluten. The utility of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) using cereal-specific peptide markers to detect gluten in heavily processed food types was assessed. A range of breakfast products, including breakfast cereals, breakfast bars, milk-based breakfast drinks, powdered drinks, and a savory spread, were tested. No gluten was detected by LC-MS in the food products labeled gluten-free, yet enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurement revealed inconsistencies in barley-containing products. In products containing wheat, rye, barley, and oats as labeled ingredients, gluten proteins were readily detected using discovery proteomics. Panels comprising ten cereal-specific peptide markers were analyzed by targeted proteomics, providing evidence that LC-MS could detect and differentiate gluten in complex matrices, including baked goods and milk-based products.

DOI

10.3390/molecules24203665

Access Rights

free_to_read

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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