Title

Immersion within 360 video settings: Capitalising on embodied perspectives to develop reflection-in-action within pre-service teacher education

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Title

Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World

Publisher

Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, Inc

School

School of Education / Edith Cowan Institute for Education Research

RAS ID

19976

Comments

Originally published as: Ibrahim-Didi, K. (2015). Immersion within 360 video settings: Capitalising on embodied perspectives to develop reflection-in-action within pre-service teacher education. In T. Thomas, E. Levin, P. Dawson, K. Fraser & R. Hadgraft (Eds.), Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World: Volume 38: Refereed papers from the 38th HERDSA Annual International Conference (pp 235-245). Melbourne, Australia: Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia. Original publication available here

Abstract

Teacher education needs to respond to challenge of developing teachers who can think on their feet and make responsive changes to their instructional practice in the moment. New applications of technology such as manipulable, 360-degree video can afford beginning teachers with the opportunity to explicitly develop critical skills needed to reflect-in-action. Allowing pre-service teachers to reflectively examine classroom scenarios from a situated perspective has the potential for them to increase their ability to ‘notice’ aspects of practice that have particular significance in educational settings and inform their professional responses. This immersion in the dynamic evolving context can also provide pre-service teachers the opportunity to ‘read’ the environment, examine their own immediate responses to classroom situations and learn to exercise metacognitive control over their own responses in context.Thus it can enable them to develop a sense of body awareness that complements the more intentional and cognitive aspects of reflection typically by a teacher in a real classroom setting.This paper argues for teacher education programs to draw on technologies that making tacit knowledge explicit and to inform and openly address perceptual and embodied aspects of professional vision. It proposes that these elements are central to the production of emotionally resilient, work-ready teachers. The paper also highlights the comparative advantages of 360-degree video over similar technologies such as virtual reality in prompting context-specific subtleties such as facial expressions to enable reflect in action.

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