Author Identifier

Paul F. J. Merkes
ORCID: 0000-0001-7309-2717

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports

Publisher

Wiley

School

Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research / School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

31585

Comments

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Merkes, P. F. J., Menaspà, P., & Abbiss, C. R. (2020). Power output, cadence, and torque are similar between the forward standing and traditional sprint cycling positions. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 30(1), 64-73, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13555. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

Abstract

Purpose: Compare power output, cadence, and torque in the seated, standing, and forward standing cycling sprint positions. Methods: On three separated occasions (ie, one for each position), 11 recreational male road cyclists performed a 14 seconds sprint before and directly after a high-intensity lead-up. Power output, cadence, and torque were measured during each sprint. Results: No significant differences in peak and mean power output were observed between the forward standing (1125.5 ± 48.5 W and 896.0 ± 32.7 W, respectively) and either the seated or standing positions (1042.5 ± 46.8 W and 856.5 ± 29.4 W; 1175.4 ± 44.9 W and 927.5 ± 28.9 W, respectively). Power output was higher in the standing, compared with the seated position. No difference was observed in cadence between positions. At the start of the sprint before the lead-up, peak torque was higher in the standing position vs the forward standing position; and peak torque occurred later in the pedal revolution for both the forward standing and standing positions when compared with the seated position. At the start of the sprint after the lead-up, peak torque occurred later in the forward standing position when compared with both the seated and standing position. At the end of the sprint, no difference in torque was found between the forward standing and standing position either before or after the lead-up. Conclusion: Sprinting in the forward standing sprint position does not impair power output, cadence, and torque when compared with the seated and standing sprint positions.

DOI

10.1111/sms.13555

Available for download on Friday, January 01, 2021

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