Author Identifier

Wei Wang Orcid: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1430-1360

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of cellular and molecular medicine

ISSN

1582-4934

Volume

24

Issue

2

First Page

1837

Last Page

1847

PubMed ID

31808612

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

30358

Grant Number

NHMRC Number : 1112767

Comments

Sun, Q., Xu, X., Zhang, J., Sun, M., Tian, Q., Li, Q., ... & Zhang, J. (2020). Association of suboptimal health status with intestinal microbiota in Chinese youths. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. 24(2), 1837-1847. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcmm.14880

Abstract

Suboptimal health status (SHS), a physical state between health and disease, is a subclinical and reversible stage of chronic disease. Previous studies have shown alterations in the intestinal microbiota in patients with some chronic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association between SHS and intestinal microbiota in a case-control study with 50 SHS individuals and 50 matched healthy controls. Intestinal microbiota was analysed by MiSeq 250PE. Alpha diversity of intestinal microbiota in SHS individuals was higher compared with that of healthy controls (Simpson index, W = 2238, P = .048). Beta diversity was different between SHS and healthy controls (P = .018). At the phylum level, the relative abundance of Verrucomicrobia was higher in the SHS group than that in the controls (W = 2201, P = .049). Compared with that of the control group, nine genera were significantly higher and five genera were lower in abundance in the SHS group (all P < .05). The intestinal microbiota, analysed by a random forest model, was able to distinguish individuals with SHS from the controls, with an area under the curve of 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.77-0.81). We demonstrated that the alteration of intestinal microbiota occurs with SHS, an early stage of disease, which might shed light on the importance of intestinal microbiota in the primary prevention of noncommunicable chronic diseases.

DOI

10.1111/jcmm.14880

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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