Author Identifier

Luke Hopper

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5059-7760

Peta Blevins

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5320-1784

Shona Erskine

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5386-3921

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Theatre, Dance and Performance Training

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

School

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA) / Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention

RAS ID

31436

Funders

Edith Cowan University - Open Access Support Scheme

Edith Cowan University Industry Collaboration Grant

Grant Number

G1002974

Comments

Hopper, L. S., Blevins, P., Erskine, S., Hendry, D., Hill, R., & Longbottom, R. (2020). Sustaining dancer wellbeing through independent professional dance careers. Theatre, Dance and Performance Training. https://doi.org/10.1080/19443927.2020.1740312

Abstract

Dancers dedicate their lives to their art. The lucky few dancers who reach professional careers, must navigate a casualised industry, balance financial pressures and maintain performance fitness. This research aimed to provide practical considerations for dancers to support their health and wellbeing through independent, professional dance careers. Dancers from Australian contemporary dance company Co3 participated in a training program involving psychological and physiotherapy assessments and fitness training in conjunction with a major performance season. Focus groups with company dancers and staff investigated the perceived efficacy of the training program within the company schedule and in supporting dancer wellbeing. Dancers were highly engaged with the training program. Dancers expressed various benefits and challenges in incorporating the training within the demands of their careers. Themes identified from the dancer responses included making time, program specificity, dance fitness, connecting as a company, dancer monitoring and scheduling. A need to maintain collegiality outside of contracted times through communities of practice was identified across many of the themes. It is posited that the human capital of dance is challenged through the casualisation of the dance sector and requires careful attention from aspiring dancers.

DOI

10.1080/19443927.2020.1740312

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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