Title

The power of peer-review: A tool to improve student skills and unit satisfaction

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Title

6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances

Publisher

Editorial Universitat Politecnica de Valencia

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

31631

Comments

Wallace, R., Beatty, S., Lines, J., Moore, C., & Costello, L. (2020). The power of peer-review: A tool to improve student skills and unit satisfaction. In HEAd'20: 6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (pp 605 - 617). http://dx.doi.org/10.4995/HEAd20.2020.11116

Abstract

Providing higher education students with opportunities to participate in peerreview feedback activities may facilitate interaction between students and enhance academic skills. Such activities are reported to help students transition from passive to active learners whilst increasing social connectedness and developing employability skills. This research aimed to evaluate student perceptions of a peer-review of assessment process offered in an undergraduate Health Science unit at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, and their subsequent unit satisfaction. Before students began the peer-review process, a sample assignment was used to coach them on how to provide constructive feedback. They subsequently prepared a draft of their assignment for peer-review, and then reviewed the work of another student. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to assess students’ perceptions about the usefulness of the peer-review activity. Thirty-two students completed the pre-survey wherein 94% (n=30) reported the peer-review coaching helped them prepare their own assignment and 85% (n=27) reported learning how to provide constructive written feedback. Twenty-one students completed the post-survey, 76% (n=16), reporting they modified their own assignment as an outcome of their peer-review participation. Many respondents also reported improvements in their critical thinking (76%; n=16) and written communication skills (62%; n=13). Overall unit satisfaction increased exponentially.

DOI

10.4995/HEAd20.2020.11116

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