Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Experimental Gerontology

ISSN

05315565

Volume

138

PubMed ID

32562747

Publisher

Elsevier

School

Exercise Medicine Research Institute

Funders

Centre of Research Excellence in Protate Cancer Survivorship Scholarship

Comments

© 2020. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Lopez, P., Crosby, B. J., Robetti, B. P., Turella, D. J. P., Weber, T. A. S., de Oliveira, M. L., & Rech, A. (2020). Effects of an 8-week resistance training intervention on plantar flexor muscle quality and functional capacity in older women: A randomised controlled trial. Experimental gerontology, 138, article 111003. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2020.111003

Abstract

© 2020 The present study examined 8 weeks of resistance training and its effects on muscle quality measures, plantar flexor muscle strength, muscle thickness and functional capacity in older women. Moreover, we tested if changes in muscle quality were associated with functional capacity. Twenty-four older women (66.3 ± 5.8 years; 69.0 ± 3.0 kg; 25.3 ± 1.4 kg·m−2) were recruited to the study. After completion of the baseline assessment, participants were randomly assigned to either the resistance training (RET, n = 12) or an active control group (CTR, n = 12). Muscle quality was evaluated through muscle echo intensity (MQEI) and specific tension (MQST). Muscle thickness, unilateral plantar flexor muscle strength and functional tests were evaluated at baseline and after the training period. After 8 weeks, both MQEI and MQST did not respond to the intervention. Furthermore, significant changes in stair climb performance (P < 0.05) were not associated with plantar flexor-derived muscle quality (P > 0.05). Finally, significant gains in muscle hypertrophy were observed in the RET group (P < 0.01), while muscle strength failed to change significantly (P > 0.05). In conclusion, a resistance training program provided significant benefits in the stair climb test, unrelated to plantar flexor-derived muscle quality measures as previously demonstrated in quadriceps femoris.

DOI

10.1016/j.exger.2020.111003

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Available for download on Thursday, September 30, 2021

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