Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Nutrients

Volume

12

Issue

11

First Page

1

Last Page

8

Publisher

MDPI

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

32364

Funders

Australian National Health and Medical Research Council

Comments

Gopinath, B., McMahon, C. M., Lewis, J. R., Bondonno, N. P., Bondonno, C. P., Burlutsky, G., … Mitchell, P. (2020). Associations between intake of dietary flavonoids and 10-year incidence of age-related hearing loss. Nutrients, 12(11), article 3297. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113297

Abstract

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Dietary flavonoids are vasoactive phytochemicals with promising anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to assess the associations between baseline intakes of six commonly consumed flavonoid subclasses and 10-year incidence of age-related hearing loss. At baseline, 1691 participants aged 50+ years had information on dietary intakes and hearing status. Hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone average of frequencies 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 kHz > 25 dB hearing level (HL). Dietary data were collected through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The flavonoid content of foods was estimated using US databases. During the 10-year follow-up, 260 (31.6%) new cases of hearing loss (incident) were observed. After multivariable adjustment, participants in the fourth versus first quartile (reference group) of intake of dietary isoflavone had 36% lower risk of incident hearing loss after 10 years: odds ratios (OR) 0.64 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 0.42–0.99); p-value for trend = 0.03. Nonsignificant associations were observed between the other five flavonoid subclasses and 10-year incidence of hearing loss. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that the intake of dietary flavonoids protect against long-term risk of hearing loss. The association with isoflavone intake needs to be confirmed by other population-based studies.

DOI

10.3390/nu12113297

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Prevention, detection and management of cancer and other chronic diseases

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