Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Biology

Volume

9

Issue

11

First Page

1

Last Page

12

Publisher

MDPI

School

Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research / School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

32424

Funders

Real Madrid Foundation

Comments

Marín-Pagán, C., Blazevich, A. J., Chung, L. H., Romero-Arenas, S., Freitas, T. T., & Alcaraz, P. E. (2020). Acute physiological responses to high-intensity resistance circuit training vs. traditional strength training in soccer players. Biology, 9(11), article 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9110383

Abstract

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses induced by high-intensity resistance circuit-based (HRC) and traditional strength (TS) training protocols. Ten amateur soccer players reported to the laboratory on four occasions: (1) protocol familiarization and load determination; (2) maximal oxygen consumption test; (3) and (4) resistance training protocols (HRC and TS), completed in a cross-over randomized order. In both protocols, the same structure was used (two blocks of 3 sets × 3 exercises, separated by a 5-min rest), with only the time between consecutive exercises differing: TS (3 min) and HRC (~35 s, allowing 3 min of local recovery). To test for between-protocol differences, paired t-tests were applied. Results showed that oxygen consumption and heart rate during HRC were 75% and 39% higher than TS, respectively (p < 0.001). After the training sessions, blood lactate concentration at 1.5, 5 and 7 min and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption were higher in HRC. The respiratory exchange ratio was 6.7% greater during HRC, with no between-group differences found post-exercise. The energy cost of HRC was ~66% higher than TS. In conclusion, HRC training induces greater cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses in soccer players and thus may be a time-effective training strategy.

DOI

10.3390/biology9110383

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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