Title

Does muscle–tendon unit structure predispose to hamstring strain injury during running? A critical review

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Sports Medicine

Volume

51

Issue

2

First Page

215

Last Page

224

Publisher

Springer

School

Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research / School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

35494

Funders

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul

Comments

Huygaerts, S., Cos, F., Cohen, D. D., Calleja-González, J., Pruna, R., Alcaraz, P. E., & Blazevich, A. J. (2021). Does muscle–tendon unit structure predispose to hamstring strain injury during running? A critical review. Sports Medicine, 51(2), 215-224. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-020-01385-7

Abstract

© 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG. Hamstring strain injury (HSI) remains the most common muscle injury in high-intensity running in humans. The majority of acute HSI occur specifically within the proximal region of the long head of biceps femoris and there is a sustained interest among researchers in understanding the factors that predispose to HSI. The present critical review describes the current understanding of biceps femoris long head (BFlh) structural features that might influence strain injury risk. Inter-individual differences in muscle–tendon architecture and interactions, muscle fiber type and region-specific innervation are likely to influence biceps femoris long head injury risk and might inform why some individuals are at an increased risk of sustaining a HSI during running. However, more research is needed, with future studies focusing on prospective data acquisition, improved computer simulations and direct imaging techniques to better understand the relationship between structural features, hamstring muscle function, and injury risk.

DOI

10.1007/s40279-020-01385-7

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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