Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

PLoS ONE

Volume

16

Issue

1 January

PubMed ID

33493189

Publisher

PLOS

School

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA)

RAS ID

35523

Funders

Nagoya Gakuin University Grant

Comments

Sato, N., & Hopper, L. S. (2021). Judges' evaluation reliability changes between identifiable and anonymous performance of hip-hop dance movements. PLoS ONE, 16(1), article e0245861. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0245861

Abstract

© 2021 Sato, Hopper. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Hip-hop competitions are performed across the world. In the recent inclusion in the 2018 Youth Olympic Games, the assessment of hip-hop performance is undertaken by a panel of judges. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of different visualisation tools utilised in the assessment of the hip-hop dance movements. Ten dancers performed basic rhythmic hip-hop movements which were captured using a motion capture system and video camera. Humanoid and stick figure animations of the dancers’ movements were created from the motion capture data. Ten judges then assessed 20 dance trials through observation using three different visualisation tools on a computer display, each of which provided different representations of a given hip-hop performance: (1) the actual video of the dancers; (2) an anonymous stick figure animation; (3) an anonymous humanoid animation. Judges were not informed that they were repeating an assessment of the performances across the three visualisation tools. The humanoid animation demonstrated the highest inter-class correlation coefficients among the three methods. Despite the stick figure animation demonstrating moderate to high reliability, both the humanoid animation and the video demonstrated very high reliability in the intra-class correlation coefficient. It is recommended that further research is undertaken exploring the use of humanoid animation as a formative assessment tool in the evaluation of hip-hop dance and the evolution of hip-hop into a respected artistic athletic discipline.

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0245861

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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