Date of Award

2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts Honours

Faculty

Faculty of Community Services, Education and Social Sciences

First Advisor

Dr Lynne Cohen

Abstract

Research emphasises the importance of adolescents' psychological sense of belonging in relation to academic, motivational, psychosocial, developmental, and behavioural outcomes, particularly during transition to high school. However, adolescents' adjustment during transition period does not occur in isolation, it occurs in conjunction with normative biopsychosocial change-related effects. As most of adolescents biopsychosocial needs are negotiated in high school, the school's social context assumes a fundamental role in facilitating successful adolescent adjustment, and school belonging. Features of the high school context such as perceived peer, parent, and teacher support have an influence on adolescents' perceived belonging. Similarly, the educational values, in terms of goal structures, and emphasis on expectancy for success, that schools and teachers adopt is positively associated with adolescent perceived self-efficacy and feelings of self-worth. However, relatively few studies have examined school belonging in relation to competency beliefs and self-worth per se. Much of the existing research has primarily focused on academic and motivational outcomes, suggesting that future research in this area is necessary'.

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