Date of Award

1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Education Honours

Faculty

Faculty of Education

First Advisor

Dr David Evans

Abstract

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is rapidly becoming an important educational issue. Although much research has been conducted into the effects of labelling and teachers' attitudes and expectations on children's academic and social behaviour, little research has been conducted into the relationship between the label 'ADD' and teachers' attitudes and expectations. The main purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the ADD label on teachers' attitudes and expectations for children with ADD. In addition, the effects of teachers personal characteristics on their attitudes and expectations for children with ADD, and teachers perceptions of issues surrounding ADD were investigated. The study was conducted utilising self-report data collected from instruments consisting of one of two vignettes describing the typical ADD behaviours of a hypothetical child, and a Likert-type rating scale. Primary school teachers exposed to the vignette containing the ADD label formed the experimental group, while those who completed the vignette without the ADD label formed the control group. The results revealed the ADD label and teachers' personal characteristics had no effect on their attitudes and expectations regarding children with ADD. The results also showed teachers feel they need more resources (e.g., information, teaching strategies, support) in order to meet the needs of children with learning and behaviour disorders such as ADD.

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