Date of Award

1999

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science Honours

Faculty

Faculty of Communications, Health and Science

First Advisor

Malcolm Yeo

Second Advisor

Elizabeth Derricks

Abstract

The study investigated the perceived effects of cross-cultural interaction on ab-initio flight crew training between Anglo Australian flight instructors and Asian students. Students and instructors perceptions were sought as to whether they believed that cross-cultural interaction would impede learning. The sample included forty-eight students and nine instructors from two flying schools. Thirty-eight students were required to complete a 15 item survey and ten students and nine instructors participated in a semi-structured interview. The research identified four specific areas - language, studying and teaching methods, attitudes towards asking questions, and command decision making. Cross-cultural interaction was found to be an integral factor in determining the rate and quality of learning. The results showed that language barriers and different cultural expectations (i.e. studying and teaching methods, attitudes towards asking questions, and reticence to make command decisions) led to a reduction in the quality of training and an increase in learning time.

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