Title

Repeated simulated match-induced changes in finger flexor force and blood acid-base balance in world-class female judokas

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

Volume

17

Issue

10

First Page

1499

Last Page

1506

PubMed ID

35894825

Publisher

Human Kinetics

School

Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research / School of Medical and Health Sciences

Comments

Bardin, J., Bourdier, P., Bontemps, B., Diry, A., Birat, A., Blazevich, A. J., ... & Ratel, S. (2022). Repeated simulated match-induced changes in finger flexor force and blood acid-base balance in world-class female judokas. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 17(10), 1499-1506. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2022-0057

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the time course of maximal isometric finger flexor force and blood acid-base balance during repeated simulated matches in world-class judokas. Methods: Seven 21-to 28-year-old world-class female judokas (including Olympic and World Championship medalists) repeated four 4-minute judo combats interspersed by 15 minutes of passive recovery. Maximal voluntary isometric finger flexor contraction (MVIC) force was measured in both hands after warm-up and immediately after each combat using a handgrip dynamometer. MVIC force was classified as MVIC hikite force (pulling hand) and MVIC tsurite force (lifting hand). Results: Blood lactate concentration, pH, bicarbonate concentration, partial pressure of oxygen, and oxygen saturation were measured between 3 and 5 minutes after each match. At completion of the fourth combat, mean MVIC hikite and tsurite force decreased by 18 % and 12 %, respectively (g = 0.23 and 0.29, respectively; P.05), demonstrating that force production was substantial throughout repeated matches. Blood lactate concentration increased 5-fold from 2.69 (1.37) mmol L-1 after warm-up to 13.10 (2.61) mmol L-1 after the last match (g = 4.13, P = .018). Concurrently, blood pH decreased slightly from 7.44 (0.03) to 7.26 (0.05) (g = 2.34, P = .018), that is, by only 0.18 units. The decreased blood pH was significantly correlated with a decrease in bicarbonate concentration (R2 = .94, P.001). Finally, partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation remained unchanged during the judo contest. Conclusions: Female world-class judokas were able to maintain a high level of grip strength in both hands and efficiently regulate blood acid-base balance during repeated simulated high-intensity matches.

DOI

10.1123/ijspp.2022-0057

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