Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reports

Volume

5

Issue

1

First Page

111

Last Page

120

Publisher

IOS Press

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Precision Health / Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care

RAS ID

35718

Funders

Edith Cowan University National Health and Medical Research Council Funding information : https://doi.org/10.3233/ADR-200246

Grant Number

NHMRC Number : APP1161706

Comments

Fernandez, S., Burnham, S. C., Milicic, L., Savage, G., Maruff, P., Peretti, M., ... Laws, S. M. (2021). SPON1 is associated with amyloid-β and APOE ε4-related cognitive decline in cognitively normal adults. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reports, 5(1), 111-120. https://doi.org/10.3233/ADR-200246

Abstract

Background: Genetic variation in Spondin-1, specifically rs11023139, has been associated with reduced rates of cognitive decline in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether the association was present in cognitively normal older adults. Methods: Longitudinal cognitive decline was investigated using linear mixed modelling in a cohort of 590 cognitively normal older adults enrolled in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study. Results: No independent effect of Spondin-1 rs11023139 on cognitive decline was observed. However, significant associations were observed for the interaction between Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ϵ4 and rs11023139 in individuals with high amyloid-β burden. APOE ϵ4/rs11023139-A carriers declined significantly faster than APOE ϵ4/rs11023139-G-G carriers in measures of global cognition (p=0.011) and verbal episodic memory (p=0.020). Conclusion: These results suggest that carriage of the Spondin-1 rs11023139-A allele significantly contributes to a worsening of cognitive performance in APOE ϵ4 cognitively normal older adults with a high neocortical amyloid-β burden.

DOI

10.3233/ADR-200246

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Neuroscience and neurorehabilitation

Included in

Neurosciences Commons

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