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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1976v1n1.3

Abstract

Traditionally we have come to regard the disabled reader as one who is deficient in ability to recognize words in isolation / context, whose word attack skills are so deficient that we throw up our hands in horror at his inability to come up with anything like what is in print, and who is generally unable to obtain a glimmer of understanding into the meaning of what he is reading. At a somewhat lower level than this type of reader is the illiterate and whether the illiterate is entitled to be regarded as a " reader ", disabled or otherwise, is problematical. However, for the purpose of this discussion today. I intend to incorporate the illiterate into some aspects of this paper.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1976v1n1.3