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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1991v16n1.4

Abstract

In this paper it is argued that many countries see education as partly concerned with the "Affective" dimension. It is then suggested that the way this is interpreted and responded to varies considerably and usually involves some ambivalence. Having identified different kinds of responses what can be described as the generalist approach is focused on, where all teachers are seen as sharing the responsibility for the pupils' pastoral care and personal and social education. This is then considered in relation to the situation in primary schools and the training of primary teachers. Having suggested why specific training needs have tended to remain unidentified and unmet, a case is presented for the recognition of a specific set of training needs and a particular approach to planning. It is not suggested that no effective pastoral care or personal and social education in primary schools takes place nor that there is no appropriate training. What is argued is that this tends to incidental rather than systematic. This paper is therefore intended to provide an example of a way in which a more systematic approach could be developed.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1991v16n1.4