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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1994v19n1.1

Abstract

This issue will focus on the National Schools Project, an ambitious action research project involving 200 schools across the country. At one level, the Project is only incidentally pertinent to teacher educators - it has been a large, costly attempt to change the way schools operate; should it succeed in the longer term in achieving its purposes, prospective teachers will require a new range of skills and understandings. There is a second more immediate reason. In some states, teacher educators have played an influential role as 'critical friends' of school staff engaged in the taxing task of changing the way schools operate. Their work, and the principles that have underpinned the way in which they have worked in schools, suggest that 'teacher educator' may no longer be an appropriate appellation for University-based educators, smacking as it does of an expert-novice relationship. School teachers and university teachers are learners as well as educators. Finally, it is conceivable that school restructuring may provide lessons for imminent teacher education restructuring.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1994v19n1.1