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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1994v19n1.4

Abstract

The school's desire to be a part of the National Schools Project arose from its local circumstances. Situated in the northern suburbs of AdelaIde, Salisbury North Primary School caters to a highly disadvantaged community. Over 80 per cent of students are from households whose income is low enough to qualify for government assistance. This figure has been steadily rising over the last few years. The student population is also remarkably diverse. Of an enrolment of 280 children in year levels 3-7, thirty percent are of non-English speaking background, twenty five percent are part of a new arrivals program, and over 10 percent are Aboriginal. Recent tests, carried out as part of a research project by the University of South Australia, suggest that many of these children are more than two years below average in attainment. The behaviour of a small but significant percentage of students is highly disruptive. These factors led to questions being asked by members of the staff about how the school organisation could be improved so as to ensure that the learning potential of these students was realised. Participation in the National Schools Project seemed to offer an opportunity to critically examine current practice. The Project also provided a mandate to consider radical options which might help the staff and community achieve their objectives.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1994v19n1.4