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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2012v37n5.1

Abstract

There is strong evidence to show that beliefs about knowing and knowledge held by individuals (personal epistemologies) influence preservice teachers’ learning strategies and learning outcomes (Muis, 2004). However, we know very little about how preservice teachers’ personal epistemologies change as they progress through their teacher education programs. This study investigated changes in personal epistemology and beliefs about learning for a group of preservice teachers as they progressed through the four years of a Bachelor of Education degree. Preservice teachers completed the Epistemological Beliefs Survey (EBS, Kardash & Wood, 2000) when they commenced their course (Time 1) when they were in the 3rd year of their course (Time 2) and then again in the final year of their degree (Time 3). Findings indicated that there were significant changes in preservice teachers’ personal epistemologies between course entry and the final year of their course across all but one of the dimensions measured. Results are discussed in terms of the implications for teaching and teacher education.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2012v37n5.1