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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1980v5n1.3

Abstract

This study has focused on identifying inservice primary school teachers' communicating styles. An underlying assumption is that no one style can be considered good or bad; and, no style is preferred as more right than another. However, if clusters of primary school teachers' communicating styles can be identified it could provide empirical data on the ways teachers transmit and receive information. Such data might be useful to teacher educators for designing and implementing inservice programs based on the ways teachers transmit and receive information. Hence, the effectiveness of inservice education efforts might be improved because they could be related to the teachers' communicating styles. Specifically, the following questions were asked: 1. What are the relationships between four specific communicating styles of primary school teachers in North Queensland? (North Queensland is defined as that area of Queensland north of Rockhampton.) 2. Do these relationships alter according to the subjects': age, sex, years of teaching experience, grade level taught, and geographic location (rural/suburban)?

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1980v5n1.3