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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1983v8n2.8

Abstract

Since the 1950s, pre-service teachers and teacher educators have been caught in a quagmire of confusion as teacher education came to be held in increasingly poor repute. More recently, in Britain and Australia particularly, colleges and faculties of education took the major brunt of cuts in spending on education. Most of the old certainties - the certainty of a job at the end of one's training; the certainty of the absorption model of teacher training characterised by the 'give 'em a bit of everything and turn 'em loose' philosophy; the certainty of tenure in a college lecturing position - vanished in a very brief period. Vocal students argued that teacher education was inadequate; academics challenged what they saw as weak content taught by sub-standard staff; some schools tended to treat teacher education as a bit of a nuisance, if not actually totally irrelevant; while employing authorities regarded it as blameworthy for not being more efficient in producing a more desirable product (Claydon and Lovegrove, 1972).

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1983v8n2.8