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Australian Journal of Teacher Education

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

DOI

10.14221/ajte.2018v44n4.2

Abstract

The present study used an established model of feedback (Hattie & Timperley, 2007) as a framework to explore which types and levels of feedback are most common in the upper primary classroom. Results demonstrate that feedback was predominantly directed toward the task level and that feed forward, information about the next steps for learning, was the least occurring feedback type in the classroom. Based upon research and findings, the authors propose a conceptual matrix of feedback that bridges research to practice with the aim of feedback being a driver to promote improvement.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2018v44n4.2