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Australian Journal of Teacher Education

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

DOI

10.14221/ajte.2021v46n6.5

Abstract

Australian Initial Teacher Education (ITE) has long been marred by instability, scrutiny and high academic workloads. University wide workforce changes and the proliferation of online education require ongoing consideration as these factors have the potential to both enrich ITE and exacerbate existing issues. As subsect of ITE, preservice primary science education faces unique hurdles as establish student-centred, authentic practices have historically been delivered by tenured staff in traditional face-to-face settings. This paper aims to explore online teaching practices and teaching team composition in Australian preservice primary science education via interview and survey data collected from 17 academics in a Type II case study. Results showed varied, often asynchronous approaches to online education; punctuated by elements of academic resistance. Teaching teams were increasingly dependent on sessional staff, which has resulted in complex benefits and detriments. Researchers and administrators need to work proactively to determine how both online practices should be utilised and teaching teams should be structured to deliver high quality ITE.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2021v46n6.5