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Abstract

Providing effective feedback to students is a significant issue for Australian educators. The ability to provide effective feedback comprises one of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers and is seen as being a key element of quality teaching. Much research has been conducted into what constitutes effective feedback. Yet in spite of this existing knowledge, evidence suggests that feedback continues to be poorly received by students. The overall purpose of this research was to explore how ten Year Seven students (aged 12-13) reflected on and responded to written teacher feedback on a music history/appreciation project. Data from this pilot study revealed that students reflected on and responded to feedback based on personal features, task perceptions and individual choices. Findings from this study are relevant to teachers and teacher educators interested in improving classroom feedback practices.

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